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January | February 2004

features

TREASURE HUNT

ASK THIS OLD HOUSE

ASK THIS OLD HOUSE

features

A contemporary Craftsman borrows the best from the past A NEW OLD HOUSE

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features

TREASURE HUNT

Salvage yards are a gold mine of vintage house parts. The crew shows how to separate the gems from the junk

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ASK THIS OLD HOUSE

ASK THIS OLD HOUSE

Some time ago I replaced the inexpensive fiberglass air filters in our forced-air heating system with more expensive pleated filters, which I thought would be more effective. But the person who serviced my system said that the pleated filters add too much resistance to air flow through the ducts, making the system more expensive to operate.
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features

A contemporary Craftsman borrows the best from the past A NEW OLD HOUSE

Old houses feel different from new ones, and there’s good reason: Finely crafted details and wood finishes that have been burnished by time give these spaces charm and character. Some homeowners recapture the past by buying a fine old home and rejuvenating it.

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UPKEEP

Shocking Truths

The top 10 wiring problems and what to do about them

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features

HOLLYWOOD COMEBACK

A CRUMBLING ESTATE FROM THE 1920s GETS A NEW LEASE ON LIFE

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features

STOVES, COOKTOPS, AND OVENS

A lot has changed in the American kitchen in the last quarter century. (And not just because men wear the aprons more often than they used to.) When This Old House first hit the airwaves in 1979, the standard American kitchen featured a four-burner electric range—preferred because no one had yet figured out a way to make gas ovens self-cleaning—and, for a lucky few, an over-the-stove microwave.

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25th ANNIVERSARY FROM THE GROUND UP FOUNDATIONS

AS proper foundation does more than just hold a house above ground. It also keeps out moisture, insulates against the cold, and resists movement of the earth around it. Oh, and one more thing: It should last forever. No wonder builders like This Old House general contractor Tom Silva take foundations seriously.

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HOMEOWNER’S HANDBOOK

Replacing an Interior Door with This Old House general contractor Tom Silva

Replacing an existing door with a new one is just about as easy as it sounds—you use the old door as a template to cut the new door to size and to outfit it with hinges and a lockset. Then you replace it in the existing jamb. No fuss, no muss. Switching out the door in an old jamb is a great solution when you have a door that’s badly warped or damaged, or when you want to upgrade all the doors in your home to improve quality or change style.

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TV Project

PUSHING AHEAD

As work on the Concord cottage nears completion, the TOH crew figures out how to make the most of a small space

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TALKINGSHOP: fire extinguishers

Flame Fighters

Choosing and using fire extinguishers

WINTER2003 March2004